Question about game engines.

  • Is it possible for a game to have 2 (or more) different engines working together? Like, for example, if ironsight could be run by both the source and iron engine? Or if battlefield could be run both by Frostbite with Unity engine?



    maybe in a way on how two different batteries can be spliced together without causing problems?

  • That's more rather like combining two different car engines where they both should try to run. So far I've never seen a game where they use two different engines to combine two different mechanics. I believe you can use only one or the other else it won't make much sense

  • That's more rather like combining two different car engines where they both should try to run. So far I've never seen a game where they use two different engines to combine two different mechanics. I believe you can use only one or the other else it won't make much sense

    In a way, It does make sense to do so. Some engines are better that others in one aspect, and worse in other (ie better physics with less graphical beauty, and vice versa.) .


    The thought came to my mind after reading a few posts on iron engine's performances on Ryzen chips. Imagine if the user could interchange one engine over the other simply because that engine works better on Ryzen than the other? Similarly, one could have both engines active, where one engine will focus on giving better graphics, while the other focuses on giving better performances?


    If I had to give an example: I'm pretty sure the Iron Engine can provide better graphics than the source engine, but the source engine has better physics support as well as giving a better performance on computers that uses Ryzen. Both of them uses DirectX9. If it is possible to splice them together, we can get the best of both worlds.


    Of course, My knowledge in this field of game development is rather limited. Maybe things go worse if one tries to keep both engines active, or it may not be possible to do so at all. Or maybe it is possible, and the outcome is good? Either way the thought of having a "dual engine" sounds unique.

  • I'm sure it has been done, but can't really name much good examples out of my head.


    First there are of course a bunch of very old games that have turned out to be extremely successful, so that there were modernized and visually appealing remakes later on. Such as the original Tomb Raider with the original Lara Croft, the very first Doom, but also much older games such as Space Quest and others (nearly all the classic retro games that you can now play in windows and on smartphones)


    There have also been a bunch of very successful games that were adapted from one technical platform to also run another incompatible platform with different operating systems and hardware, etc.


    And then of course (especially in the early days) successful games were often copied and cloned on other platforms. Usually with slight variations and under a different name, but with very much the same style of gameplay.


    But there are also games which were developed with one engine, one technical standard, or platform that turned out to be already outdated by the time the game was getting finished, so they quickly released an updated/adapted version to run with modern graphics adapters or on modern platforms.

    For example back in the early days of OpenGL standard suddenly the Voodoo 3DFX graphics came out and suddenly became extremely popular and then from Microsoft Direct3D and DirectX. Back then there were a bunch of games that were more or less hastily adapted to accommodate for the competing brand new popular 3D standards and graphics cards the games originally didn't support.

    But generally speaking (with few exceptions) the games always looked and performed best on the platform or the standards that they were originally and primarily designed for.


    Today you can commonly get a whole bunch of popular games that are adapted to run on different game consoles with slight differences from platform to platform. Like Star Wars Battlefront I and II for PC , X-box and PS4 and all those other popular titles you can get for those.


    But I don't know of any really popular brand new games that are intentionally designed to run with two different "game engines".

    it would certainly be possible, but would come with the same big downsides as in the old days of competing 3D standards.

    The developers would either have to limit the game to what both engines can achieve easily and are more or less compatible in. That would mean they would sort of intentionally leave out a bunch of the "fancy" specialized stuff, that effectively really provides the major advantages of using the specific engines. Or they would have to put a lot of effort and money into practically developing the game almost "twice". Which again is of course only a commercially viable option if it's certain to become a very popular game on each of the engines and if that is really necessary to be able to publish it on different platforms such as PC, Mac, X-box, PS4, Nintendo Wii, or for smartphones....

    Classic Darwin Method Contraception

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Contraception ().